Tuesday, February 19, 2013

I Like Greyhawk, But Not That Much

I like classic D&D, I like Blackmoor and I really like Greyhawk, but Wizards of the Coast's new reprint of the OD&D booklets? Uh, no thanks! I'd rather have the original copies in a shoe box. What do you guys think? Is this reprint over the top?

11 comments:

The Grey Elf said...

I think it's fantastic, and even though I've already got copies of the originals, I will be buying it. No, I don't think it's overpriced. Why? Check my blog out to see :)

http://wastedlandsfantasy.blogspot.com/2013/02/od-premium-edition-reprint.html

Celestian said...

Unlike it seems most "grogs" I am not a fan of the old books. I might throw out some cash for a red box because I might use it with the kids but the older stuff is just to primitive for me.

I am sure the 3e and 4e folks say that about me sticking with AD&D tho.

Atom Kid said...

I didn't start off with the original books either, but started with the Basic/Expert set. I'd still consider getting this though, $150 is a bit steep for me.

Scott said...

One man's "over the top" is another man's "as lavish as it deserves". This deluxe boxed set is exciting, amazing news.

Anonymous said...

It's not over the top, because the underlying rules are available in innumerable free & value priced iterations. This is a vanity treatment, priced so that those who buy it can blog about it in good conscience.

Mystic Scholar said...

Having the originals makes this a "no brainer" for me as well. I'm with you on this one, Mort.

Dethand said...

I'm all for it. It's the same exact content in with new covers. If you have an emotional attachment to the originals then it's a good bet that you are in the zero f%cksgiving category of the grogs camp. The main point I think you miss here is that it's being offered again. Given some new artwork and put in something other than a crusty shoebox as a fancy dan item. I think it's great that it gets to be out of peoples hermetically sealed plastic vaults (or crusty shoeboxes). That said I have my old set but who knows they might look good in this box with some mud dice tucked in for good measure!

mortellan said...

Good points everyone!
I think my own thought process is a bit inbetween. All I own is a couple of these books. I collect things as I go. I'm starting to see these reprints are doing well for Wizards or else they wouldn't go so far back. I don't have a problem buying a single reprint of a book but I've never bought into box-set collections or premium stuff before (leather bound, gold leaf, etc).
So yeah, I hope for Wizards' sake their -new- stuff will excite people as much as their repackaged old stuff, or reprints may be their only recourse. These are interesting times.

mntnjeff said...

Are they playable? I know that this sounds like a ridiculous question, but I started at Holmes and have never played an edition prior to that.

I've heard both positive and negative (from grognards) about the original rules.

I'm not collector, I'm a player. If I bought these it would be to play...

Playable? Or stick w/ S&W?

mortellan said...

I'm sure they are playable. The set comes with dice to boot. The trouble I have is, it's sometimes hard to go from more "advanced" editions to earlier versions. It's like my brain's software won't accept the program without some work arounds. :P

Michael Jamison said...

I am not terribly familiar with the original set, but I have read from other sources that the original D&D requires Chainmail for its 1:1 combat rules. Since it's a a hundred and fifty bucks and not playable, you have to ask if it's worth the price merely as a reference tool. This will actually be a question of whether one hundred and fifty bucks means all that much to me later on this year.

Of course, if WOTC added the rules for thieves that was inserted into Great Plains Game Players #9, then _that_ would change my outlook _entirely_.